Dalrymple Lecture: Lecture Two – Living in luxury: the late Roman villa at Caddeddi on the Tellaro
Tuesday 14 November 2017, 06:30pm
Contact Dorothy Gormlie Vice-President, Lecture and Correspondence Secretary

Mosaic from CaddeddiThe second lecture of 2017/2018's Dalrymple Lecture Series will continue with Lecture Two – Living in luxury: the late Roman villa at Caddeddi on the Tellaro at 6.30pm on Tuesday, November 14, 2017, in the Sir Charles Wilson Lecture Theatre, University of Glasgow (corner of Gibson Street and University Avenue). Lectures are free to attend and open to members and non-members of Glasgow Archaeological Society alike.

For more information about the Dalrymple Lectures and an overview of this year's series with Professor Roger Wilson of the University of British Columbia, please click here. 

 

Lecture Two – Living in luxury: the late Roman villa at Caddeddi on the Tellaro

The Roman villa in contrada Caddeddi on the Tellaro river, near Noto in south-east Sicily, was discovered by chance in 1970; but it was only opened to the public in 2008 and remains little known. The villa dates to the second half of the fourth century AD, and so belongs a generation or more later than the famous villa of Casale near Piazza Armerina. This talk will look at what is known about this élite Sicilian residence of a late Roman aristocrat, and will consider in detail the three figured mosaics, setting them in context by comparing them with parallels elsewhere. It seems very probable that all the floors were laid by itinerant African craftsmen based at Carthage, working at Caddeddi on an overseas contract. Particularly impressive is the dazzling polychromy of these pavements and the wide range of incidental detail that they contain about the late Roman world, both civilian and military.

About the Professor Wilson

R. J. A. Wilson is Director of the Centre for the Study of Ancient Sicily at the University of British Columbia. He has also been Professor of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire at UBC, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham, and Associate Professor at Trinity College Dublin. Recipient of the Killam Prize at UBC for his contributions to research, he is the author or editor of ten books and over 140 papers. He has held visiting positions at the University of Bonn, McMaster University, the British School of Rome and the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, and has been Norton Lecturer of the Archaeological Institute of America. His research concerns mainly the Roman archaeology of the central Mediterranean, with a special emphasis on Sicily.

Location Sir Charles Wilson Lecture Theatre, University of Glasgow (corner of Gibson Street and University Avenue)